Essays On Religion And The Ancient World

Essays On Religion And The Ancient World-43
He problematises the ways that the Roman festival calendar might reveal cultural or collective memory, reminding us to acknowledge the divergent personal experiences inherent in it, and how the selective destruction/preservation of monuments was part of a renewal and reinvention process, building and updating Rome's collective civic myth through the excision or valorisation of particular religious loci, because memory only matters for so long: 'as the hold of memory in lived experience weakens, history takes over' (p. In Part VII, entitled 'Expressiveness', Schörner's broad temporal and geographical look at anatomical ex votos highlights some of the differences between practice and belief in Greece, Anatolia, Gaul and Italy and raises questions about the place of these votives within differing systems of medicine.

He problematises the ways that the Roman festival calendar might reveal cultural or collective memory, reminding us to acknowledge the divergent personal experiences inherent in it, and how the selective destruction/preservation of monuments was part of a renewal and reinvention process, building and updating Rome's collective civic myth through the excision or valorisation of particular religious loci, because memory only matters for so long: 'as the hold of memory in lived experience weakens, history takes over' (p. In Part VII, entitled 'Expressiveness', Schörner's broad temporal and geographical look at anatomical ex votos highlights some of the differences between practice and belief in Greece, Anatolia, Gaul and Italy and raises questions about the place of these votives within differing systems of medicine.

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Mr Holland'S Opus Essays - Essays On Religion And The Ancient World

Given Rüpke's call towards the end of the volume for an archaeology of individualisation, it is slightly jarring that Van Andringa advocates the dismissal of smaller offerings such as terracotta figurines, often found in backfill or pits at sanctuaries, as too diverse to be of use in deciding what is 'consistent and normative' in a given religious context (p. The urge to categorise is at the heart of Luginbühl's paper (pp.For Stavrianopoulou, processions should be understood as communicative events that perform social institutions as well as mediate them, whether these are military triumphs or funerary journeys.Through their performance, processions constitute space and its limits; through their staging, processions create intense physical and emotional experiences which gave them meaning and generated social memory (both for actors and audience); and through this interplay between actor and audience, a community supportive of the ritual itself is formed.This theme is picked up in a number of contributions.Lived ancient religious experience, as manifested internally and externally through the concept of embodiment, is explored in four essays comprising Part II.451-461) argue that instead of trying to use material culture to tell us about meaning, we should look at how it was used to construct ritual and create a sense of religious belonging.What is important is what material culture does in group-making processes to generate socially meaningful categories, and how it acts as a 'community identifier' for the 'imagined communities' they discuss.117) to enlighten us as to how ancient people ordered their world through bodily techniques, the ordering of society through perceptions of the body is at the heart of Várhelyi's (pp.120-130) discussion of the changes our scholarly society has undergone in its perception of ancient gender and its role in understanding the physical embodiment of ritualised behaviour: from the idea of a generalised, gendered body towards a subjective, lived experience.The first two look at physical embodiment, as demonstrated through the personal use of amulets and the wearing of ancient religious dress; the second two at more ephemeral aspects – dance, and the lived, internal interplay between gender and religious experience. 107-119) on dance and its accompanying music, an almost completely lost element of religious embodiment, encourages us to be satisfied that indirect evidence for performance space, the accoutrements of dancers and representations of dance add up to only a general understanding of the importance of the kinetic and acoustic elements of ancient religion.Although we have no insight into 'specific kinetic language in a specific cultic context' (p.

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