Light Therapy Research Papers

Light Therapy Research Papers-32
Inman has been using light therapy successfully for years, but she was skeptical at first.“I read about light therapy online during the fall of my junior year of college, but I didn’t initially purchase one because they were expensive to me, and I was not sure if they worked in the first place or if it was some sort of pseudo-science fad or placebo,” she says.Vitamin D, though popular among those who experience SAD, has had inconclusive research results as a form of treatment compared to light therapy, Roecklein says.

Inman has been using light therapy successfully for years, but she was skeptical at first.“I read about light therapy online during the fall of my junior year of college, but I didn’t initially purchase one because they were expensive to me, and I was not sure if they worked in the first place or if it was some sort of pseudo-science fad or placebo,” she says.Vitamin D, though popular among those who experience SAD, has had inconclusive research results as a form of treatment compared to light therapy, Roecklein says.

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SAD isn’t just the “winter blues,” which involves feeling fatigued and less interested in typical activities during colder months.

Also known as “subsyndromal SAD,” the winter blues is much more common, affecting about 14 percent of U. adults, but they don’t technically meet the current medical criteria for SAD, Roecklein says. In fact, it’s considered a subset of clinical depression, not a separate disorder, Roecklein says.“Unlike major depression, though, SAD is characterized by its predictability: It sets in when the seasons change — usually from summer to winter — and it returns in the same pattern for at least two years in a row,” she says.

While working from home, it gave me routine and a daily task to accomplish, which also helped morale.

I love the SAD therapy and almost feel bummed when it’s time to put it away for the spring.”For those suffering from subsyndromal SAD, or the winter blues, light therapy could work for them, too.

The treatment requires you to sit in front of a 10,000-lux light box (that’s about 100 times brighter than normal indoor lighting) for 20 minutes to an hour first thing in the morning every day during the months you experience SAD, Roecklein says.

The idea is to replace the natural sunlight you’re not getting.In high school, Kristen Inman, now 23, started noticing patterns in her mood.Struggling with undiagnosed depression, anxiety and self-harm, she became more conscious of how the seasons affected her. population experiences a form of seasonal mood disorder and depression known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.But she was seeing a licensed counselor and a psychiatrist by that point, so she asked her psychiatrist: Does it really work?“He reassured me that the science behind them had merit and recommended that I try one.“It alleviates in the spring, which, like last year, could be as early as February or sometimes as late as April.”Researchers still don’t know the exact causes of SAD, but there is a strong correlation between SAD and sunlight, Roecklein says.“Some of this can be attributed to daylight saving time.Researchers coined the term seasonal affective disorder in 1982 and two years later discovered it could be effectively treated with bright therapeutic light.In the years since, research has continued to confirm that light therapy can be effective.But treatment — even light therapy, which doesn’t require a prescription — should be discussed with a doctor, Roecklein says.“The reason is that light has similar effects in the brain as medication, and surely no one would start antidepressant medication treatment for depression without a doctor, even if their symptoms were less severe.”Sticking to a daily routine of sitting near a light for a certain amount of time probably isn’t for everyone. Thankfully, other treatment options exist for SAD, including anti-depression medication and cognitive behavioral therapy.

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