The Secret Of Shadow Ranch Book Report

The Secret Of Shadow Ranch Book Report-9
Among the most firm of these rules was the anonymity of the ghostwriters, as Stratemeyer and Adams both believed that the continuity of the series was enhanced by the popular perception that the books were all written by the same benevolent, mysterious figure of Carolyn Keene.However, this authorial cloak of anonymity was broken in the 1950s by a public relations director for a publishing house who revealed that Walter Karig had been one of the many "Carolyn Keenes" up until that point.INTRODUCTIONPRINCIPAL WORKSCRITICISMFURTHER READINGThe following entry presents commentary on the "Nancy Drew" juvenile novel series (1930–2006), written under the pseudonym "Carolyn Keene," through 2003.

Among the most firm of these rules was the anonymity of the ghostwriters, as Stratemeyer and Adams both believed that the continuity of the series was enhanced by the popular perception that the books were all written by the same benevolent, mysterious figure of Carolyn Keene.However, this authorial cloak of anonymity was broken in the 1950s by a public relations director for a publishing house who revealed that Walter Karig had been one of the many "Carolyn Keenes" up until that point.INTRODUCTIONPRINCIPAL WORKSCRITICISMFURTHER READINGThe following entry presents commentary on the "Nancy Drew" juvenile novel series (1930–2006), written under the pseudonym "Carolyn Keene," through 2003.

Still, there remains widespread debate over whether responsibility for the creative development of the Nancy Drew series rests with individual ghostwriters or with the Stratemeyer family, and the exact amount of input from each party remains a mystery.

Some of the other notable Nancy Drew ghostwriters over the years include Leslie Mc Farlane, Margaret Scherf, Nancy Axelrod, Susan Wittig Albert, James Duncan Lawrence, Wilhelmina Rankin, George Waller, Jr., and Charles Strong.

After Stratemeyer's sudden death later that same year, ownership of his company passed to his two daughters, Harriet and Edna.

Unable to find a suitable buyer for their late father's empire, Edna agreed to let Harriet purchase her share and assume leadership of the company.

The revelation was meant to enhance the profile of Karig's latest book.

This declaration, Karig later avowed, was issued without his permission as he had signed a binding contract with the Stratemeyer Syndicate.Among the beneficiaries of his estate was Mildred Wirt Benson, who is now recognized as one of the most prodigious of the Stratemeyer "half-ghosts." As the primary writer for the Nancy Drew series from 1930 to 1945, Benson was responsible for thirty-two of the early Nancy Drew books, a job for which she was paid between 5 and 0 per volume—three times her monthly salary as a journalist at the Toledo Blade.A key witness in later lawsuits, Benson was eventually given credit as a major influence on Nancy Drew's creation and evolution.The majority of the Nancy Drew mysteries share the same primary characters as well as many of the same plot elements.Of course, the star is the uncannily gifted, teenaged amateur detective Nancy Drew, whom Carol Billman describes as having "a knack for about everything—from piloting planes and boats to swimming and shooting game, from acting and dancing to evaluating art and writing short stories." As a result of the transition between writers and editors and the character's role as the model of a contemporary teenager, Nancy Drew's persona has continuously evolved over her seventy-five-year literary lifespan.The resulting lawsuit by the Syndicate, as well as another widely reported suit between rival Nancy Drew publishers in the 1980s, embarrassed the Syndicate by revealing many private details about its inner workings.Moreover, these lawsuits exposed the ironclad contracts the Syndicate required of its ghostwriters, including their agreement to forfeit any rights to royalties, although Edward Stratemeyer's 1930 will did provide for a share of royalties to writers after his death.Soon after inheriting the series, Adams began altering the nascent figure of Nancy Drew, making her slightly less boisterous and more feminine and proper.Adams vigorously protected her new creation, providing storylines for most of the subsequent Nancy Drew books as well as establishing strict rules of conduct and overarching traditions that the ghostwriters were meant to follow exactly.While these series proved popular, the arrival of The Hardy Boys in 1927 provided a substantial boost to sales.Seeking a corresponding heroine to appeal to the underdeveloped market for girl's serial fiction, Stratemeyer conceived of his infamous girl detective and, in 1930, the Nancy Drew series debuted with The Secret of the Old Clock.

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