Thomas Malthus An Essay On The Principle Of Population

Thomas Malthus An Essay On The Principle Of Population-70
All the children born, beyond what would be required to keep up the population to this level, must necessarily perish, unless room be made for them by the deaths of grown persons. To act consistently, therefore, we should facilitate, instead of foolishly and vainly endeavouring to impede, the operation of nature in producing this mortality, and if we dread the too frequent visitation of the horrid form of famine, we should sedulously encourage the other forms of destruction, which we compel nature to use.Instead of recommending cleanliness to the poor, we should encourage contrary habits.In the last 150 years of statistical history the British Isles increased their population more than fourfold, while at the same time they contributed more than 17,500,000 people to the settlement of North America and the overseas Dominions.

All the children born, beyond what would be required to keep up the population to this level, must necessarily perish, unless room be made for them by the deaths of grown persons. To act consistently, therefore, we should facilitate, instead of foolishly and vainly endeavouring to impede, the operation of nature in producing this mortality, and if we dread the too frequent visitation of the horrid form of famine, we should sedulously encourage the other forms of destruction, which we compel nature to use.

Also, they were a positive evil because they drained wealth and income from the higher (and therefore more moral) ranks of society.

These people were responsible - either in person or through patronage - for all the great achievements of society: art, music, philosophy, literature and so on owed their existence to the good taste and generosity of these people.

In our towns we should make the streets narrower, crowd more people into the houses, and court the return of the plague.

In the country we should build our villages near stagnant pools, and particularly encourage settlements in all marshy and unwholesome situations.

Preventative checks reduced the birth rate; positive checks increased the death rate.

Moral restraint, vice and birth control were the primary preventative checks.

we might probably every one of us marry at the age of puberty and yet few be absolutely starved. ] In Malthus' opinion, the masses were incapable of exercising moral restraint, which was the only real remedy for the population problem.

They were therefore doomed to live always at bare subsistence level.

Half a billion of this growth came in the 150 years from 1650 to 1800, and more than a billion has come since then.

The major characteristic of the whole period is the swarming of Europe.

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